Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
10721401T11306LYDIAN ARCHAEOLOGYCompulsory366
Level of Course Unit
First Cycle
Objectives of the Course
The purpose of the course is to give the student an intensive overview of the art and archaeology, history, and culture of the Lydian Kingdom in Asia Minor.
Name of Lecturer(s)
Prof. Dr. R. Gül GÜRTEKİN DEMİR
Learning Outcomes
1to explain the geographical landmarks of the Lydian region, as well as to know the modern and ancient names of the important rivers, lakes, mountains, etc
2to understand the reasons of foreign attacks and important battles during the rule of Lydian kingdom.
3to remember the names of significant Lydian kings and Persian Satraps.
4to describe Lydian pottery shapes and painting techniques.
5to correctly use the modern archaeological terminology in describing objects of Lydian art
6to classify different architectural pieces and small objects according to general types.
7to differentiate the methods of silver and gold refining
8to know the natural resources and popular products of Lydia
9
10
11
Mode of Delivery
Face to Face
Prerequisites and co-requisities
None
Recommended Optional Programme Components
n/a
Course Contents
During the lectures, the student will acquire the ability to recognize the major trends in the art and architecture of the Lydian civilization set within the archaeological, historical and literary contexts; this recognition will lead in turn to a greater understanding of the archaeological and historical influences achieved from and reflected in contemporary cultures. An overview of the Prehistoric remains in Lydia will also be presented, however the major focus will be on the Archaic and Achaemenid periods of the region.
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
0Introduction to the course. Research and archaeology in Lydia. Meeting. Definition of the course intents.
1The Lydian Region: Geographical landmarks. Recommended reading (Roosevelt 2009, p. 33-45, 54-58)
2Natural resources and the popular products of the Lydians.
3Lydian history and changes in political, econmic and cultural aspects: Prehistoric remains in Lydia and the beginnning of the Lydian Kingdom.
4Lydian history and changes in political, econmic and cultural aspects: The Lydian Kingdom and the Lydian Dynasities.
5Lydian defensives and related architectural remains
6Lydia sivil mimarisi; architectural terracottas.
7Mid-term exam
8Lydian burrials and burrial customs.
9Gold and Silver refinary; workshop at Sardis.
10Lydian gods and cult places. Lydian sculpture
11Lydian pottery and Lydian food&beverage.
12Persian Satrapy at Sardis & Lydia in the Achaemenid period. Intensive Reading (Dusinberre 1999, 2003)
13Lydians Abroad: Evidence from Daskyleion, Smyrna, Gordion, and Ephesos
14Lydian during the Hellenistic and Roman periods
15Final Exam
Recommended or Required Reading
Required Reading: N. D. Cahil (editör), Lydialılar ve Dünyaları. The Lydians and their World, İstanbul, 2010. Recommended Reading: Hanfmann, G. M. A. - Waldbaum, J. C., A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls, Cambridge- Massachusetts, London, 1975 -Billot, M. F., "Style et chronologie des terres cuites architecturales de Sardes", RA 2 (1980), s. 263-294. The Cambridge Ancient History. Volume III, Part 3. The Expansion of the Greek World, Eighth to Sixth Centuries. R. G. Gürtekin-Demir, “Provincial Production of Lydian Painted Pottery”, in Anatolian Iron Ages 6: Proceedings of the Sixth Anatolian Iron Ages Colloquium held at Eskişehir , 16-24 August 2004, Leuven, 2007, 47-77. E. R. M. Dusinberre, Aspects of Empire in Achaemenid Sardis, Cambridge, 2003. Greenewalt, C. H. Jr.,"Orientalizing Pottery from Sardis: The Wild Goat Style", CalifStClAnt 3 (1970), s. 55-89. Hanfmann, G. M. A. - Mierse, W. E., Sardis from Prehistoric to Roman Times. Results of the Archaeological Explorations of Sardis 1958-1975,Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1983. C. R. Roosevelt, The Archaeology of Lydia, from Gyges to Alexander, Cambridge, 2009.
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
SUM0
Language of Instruction
Turkish
Work Placement(s)
n/a
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Midterm Examination122
Final Examination122
Attending Lectures14228
Discussion10110
Question-Answer10110
Team/Group Work2510
Report Presentation224
Self Study16232
Individual Study for Homework Problems6212
Individual Study for Mid term Examination11212
Individual Study for Final Examination11414
Reading14342
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)178
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
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1
PO
2
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3
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4
PO
5
PO
6
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7
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8
PO
9
PO
10
LO15544455454
LO24455445554
LO35455445454
LO45445445454
LO55545455454
LO65455535453
LO75555555454
LO8          
LO9          
LO10          
LO11          
* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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