Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
10721401T11406INTERRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EAST AND WEST IN THE 1st MILLENIUM BCCompulsory486
Level of Course Unit
First Cycle
Objectives of the Course
The cultural and economic investments of the civilizations in the first millennium BC are discussed in this course.
Name of Lecturer(s)
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmet Kaan ŞENOL
Learning Outcomes
1 Description of the art objects produced in the first half of the first millennium BC.
2 To identify the multicultural effects of the cultural objects of the first millennium BC.
3 Understanding the role of commerce on cultural transfer
4 To understand the effects and the diversifications of the central authority on local art
5 Identify the commercial routes during the first millennium BC.
Mode of Delivery
Face to Face
Prerequisites and co-requisities
None
Recommended Optional Programme Components
None
Course Contents
After the fall of the important powers at the end of the second millennium BC, the political and commercial relations of the successors and new kingdoms bore different balances in the Mediterranean Basin. The interaction of these cultures constitutes the topics of this program.
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
1Examining the concept of the program and presenting the bibliography.Investigating the concept of the courses
2Discuss the reasons of the new economic structure of the early first millenum after the fall of the important powers at the end of the second millenium BC Reading: Winter, I. J., North Syria in the early first millenium BC., 1973, Columbia University; Roebuck, C., Economy and Society in the Early Greek World, Chicago 1979; Sheratt, S.A., “The Growth ofthe Mediterranean Economy in the Early First Millenium BC”, World Achaeology, vol. 24, no. 3, Ancient Trade: New Perspectives, 1993, 361-378.
3Phoenician role of the culture transfer in Mediterranean BasinReading: I.J. Winter, “Phoenician and North Syrian ivory carving in historical context: Questions of style and distribution”, IRAQ v.38/1, 1976, 1-22
4North Syrian and Assyrian cultural effects on Mediterranean cultures Reading: Dunbabin, T.J., The Greeks and and Their Eastern Neighbours, Chicago 1979; Strom, I., “Evidence from the sanctuaries”, in ed. by Kopcke,G. and Takumaru,I., Greece between East and West: 10th - 8th Centuries BC., 1990, Verlag Philipp Von Zabern, Mainz, Rhine
5Effects of Late Hitite art on Mediterranean cultures.Reading: Hawkins, J.D.The Neo-Hittite states in Syria and Anatolia, in ed. by Boardman J., CAH, vol.III part I, 1982 Cambridge; Akurgal, E., Anadolu Uygarlıkları, İstanbul 1988
6Cypriot art and the relations of Greeks with AlminaReading: Waldbaum, J.C., “Early Greek Contacts with the Southern Levant, c. 1000-600 BC: The Eastern Perspective”, BASOR 293, 1994, s. 53-66; Tsetskhladze, Gocha R. – Angelis, Franco De, The Archeology of Greek Colonisation: Essays Dedicated to Sir John Boardman, Oxford 1994; -(ed) Karageorghis, V., The Civilisations of the Aegean and their Diffusion in Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean, Larnaca 1996
7Greek art in Egypt Reading: Möller, A., Naukratis, Trade in Archaic Greece, New York 2000.
8Midterm examination
9Eastern influence ofn the birth of early Greek art.Reading: Cook, J.M., The Greeks in Ionia and the East, London 1970; Akurgal, E., Orient und Okzident, Barcelona 1966; Boardman, J., The Greeks Overseas: Their Early Colonies and Trade (rev. baskı, London, 1980; Cook, J., The Greeks in Ionia and the East, London, 1962
10Persian art and interaction with Anatolian culture.Reading: Knauss, F., Persian Rule in the North. Achaemenid Palaces on the Preiphery of the Empire, in – The Royal Palace Institution in the First Millennium BC, Monographs of the Danish Institute at Athens, vol. 4, 2001, pp. 125-133; Foss, C., “The Persians in Asia Minor and the End of Antiquity”, The English Historical Review, Vol. 90, No. 357. (Oct., 1975), pp. 721-747.
11Eastern influence on Etruscan art Reading: Turfa, J.M., “ Evidence for Etruscan-Punic Relations”, American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 81, No. 3 (Summer, 1977), 368-374; Grand, M., The Etruscans, London 1980
12Phrygian art and the influence of Greek artReading: Akurgal, E., Phrygische Kunst, Ankara 1955; Devries, K., “Phrygian Gordion Before Midas” Anatolian İron Ages, ed. A. Çilingiroğlu. İzmir, Ege Ünüversitesi, 6-12; Mellink, M., “The Native Kingdoms of Anatolia”, CAH., vol.3, part 2, eds. J. Boardman, I.E.S. Edwards, N.G.L. Hammond, and E. Sollberger, Cambridge University, 1991; Muscarella, O. W., “The Background to the Phrygian Bronze Industry”, Bronze working Centers of Western Asia c. 1000-539 B. C. Ed: Curtis, London, 1988, 179-192
13Influence of Urartian art on Mediterranean culture.Reading: Çilingiroğlu, A, Urartu ve Kuzey Suriye Siyasal ve Kültürel İlişkileri, İzmiri 1984; Çilingiroğlu, A, Urartu Krallığı Tarihi ve Sanatı, İzmir, 1998
14External influence on Lydian artReading: J. Boardman, “Phrygia and Lydia”, The Greek Overseas Their Early Colonies and Trade, 1982.
15Greek culture in the Western Mediterranean Reading: A. G. Woodhead, The Greeks in the West, New York 1962
16Final Examination
Recommended or Required Reading
Selected Bibliography: Desborough, V.R., The Greek Dark Ages, London 1972 Cook, J.M., The Greeks in Ionia and the East, London 1970 Boardman, J., The Greek sculpture: The late Classical Peirod and and Sculpture in Colonies and Overseas, London 1995 Dunbabin, T.J., The Greeks and and Their Eastern Neighbours, Chicago 1979 Woodhead, A.G., The Greeks in the West, London 1962 Harden, D., The Phoenicians, London 1963 Grand, M., The Etruscans, London 1980 Akurgal, E., Phrygische Kunst, Ankara 1955 Akurgal, E., Orient und Okzident, Barcelona 1966 Finley, M.I., The Ancient Economy, London 1973 Finley, M.I., Economy and Society in Ancient Greece, London 1984 Möller, A., Naukratis, Trade in Archaic Greece, New York 2000. Lehmann, G., Untersuchungen zur spaten Eisenzeit in Syrien und Libanon, Stratigraphie und Keramikformen zwischen ca. 720 bis 300 v. Chr., Münster 1996 (ed) Karageorghis, V., The Civilisations of the Aegean and their Diffusion in Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean, Larnaca 1996 (ed) Peacock, D.P.S., Pottery and Early Commerce: Characterization and Trade in Roman and Later Ceramics, London 1977. Roebuck, C., Economy and Society in the Early Greek World, Chicago 1979. Waldbaum, J.C., “Early Greek Contacts with the Southern Levant, c. 1000-6000 BC: The Eastern Perspective”, BASOR 293, 1994, s. 53-66. Waldbaum, J.C., Magness, J., “The Chronology of Early Greek Pottery: New Evidence from Seventh Century BC Destruction Levels in Israel”, AJA 101, 1997, s. 23-40.
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
SUM0
Language of Instruction
Turkish
Work Placement(s)
None
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Midterm Examination122
Final Examination122
Attending Lectures13339
Discussion133
Self Study10330
Individual Study for Homework Problems12224
Individual Study for Mid term Examination12121
Individual Study for Final Examination12020
Reading13339
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)180
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
PO
1
PO
2
PO
3
PO
4
PO
5
PO
6
PO
7
PO
8
PO
9
PO
10
LO15         
LO25      4  
LO35         
LO45 4    5  
LO55 4    4  
* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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