Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
10721402T11313MEDITERRANEAN TRADE IN THE HELLENISTIC PERIODElective354
Level of Course Unit
First Cycle
Objectives of the Course
Different categories of pottery, agricultural products and raw material are the basic elements of trade in the Hellenistic Period. The main subject of this course is to discuss the commercial relations between the Hellenistic Kingdoms and the rivalry of the producer cities in this period.
Name of Lecturer(s)
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmet Kaan ŞENOL
Learning Outcomes
1 To know the commercial goods during the Hellenistic Period.
2 To understand the importance of the power and the commercial relations after Alexander the Great.
3 Understanding the basic rules of ancient commerce during the Hellenistic Period.
4 To discuss the effects of the the city-states and the kingdoms on the Mediterranean commerce during the Hellenistic Period.
5 To understand the reasons of the flactuations of the economy during the Hellenistic Period.
Mode of Delivery
Face to Face
Prerequisites and co-requisities
None
Recommended Optional Programme Components
None
Course Contents
Economic structure during the Hellenistic Period -The effects of Alexander the Great’s revolutions on Mediterranean market - The effects of the new kingdoms on commercial life: Ptolemies, Seleucids, Macedonians, Pergamon Kingdom -Economic structure after Alexander the Great; Alexandria, Rhodes, Delos, Cyprus -Aegean Trade -Politic relations of Cartage and Rome - Economic position of Greece and Asia Minor during the Hellenistic Period -Agricultural goods; Wine, olive oil, grain, pickled fish, salted meat, fresh fruits, vegetables -Industial goods: Papyri, glass, leather, pottery, bronze and silver bowls, textile -Raw material: Precious and semi precious stones, marble, granite, copper, zinc, iron , ivory, wood.
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
1Examining the concept of the program and presenting the bibliography.Searching the concept of the courses.
2Basic lines of the Mediterranean commerce before the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Finley, M., Economy and Society in Ancient Greece, 1953; Finley, M., The Ancient Economy, 1973.
3Fluctuations of Mediterraean commerce during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Walbank, F.W., The Hellenistic age, Glaskow 1986; Derks, Hans. "The Ancient Economy: The Problem and the Fraud," The European Legacy, Vol. 7, No. 5, 2002, 597–620.
4The commercial relations of the Hellenistic Kingdoms Reading: ed. Waalbank, F.W., The Hellenistic World, CAH, VII, second edition, Cambridge 2006, 62-110.
5Big scaled commerce in Mediterranean Basin during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Austin, M.M., The Hellenistic Word from Alexander to the Roman Conquest, A Selection of Ancient Sources in Translation, 1981, 151-171; Préaux, C., Le Monde Hellénistique, La Gréce et l'Orient de la Mort d'Alexandre, A la Conquete Romaine de la Gréce (323-146 av.J.C.), Paris 1978 ; Heichelheim, F.M., An Ancient History, Vol.II, Leiden 1964.
6Egyptian commerce during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Fraser, P.M., Ptolemaic Alexandria, I.Text, Oxford 1972, 132-188; Orieux, Cl., “Les archives d’Euclés et la fin de la doréa du dioecéte Apollonios”, Chronique d'Égypte, Tome LV, No.109-110, Janvier-Juillet 1980, 213-239
7The role of Macedonian and Antiochos Kingdoms on Mediterranean commerce during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Sartre, M., Chapitre 4 L’économie urbaine (IIIe-Ier siècles), L’Anatolie héllenistique de l’Egée au Caucase, Paris 2003, 142-162.
8Midterm examination
9The role of Rhodes, Cyprus and Delos on Mediterranean commerce during the Hellenistic Period Reading: Berthold, R. M., Rhodes in the Hellenistic Age, Ithaca and London, 1984; “Rhodes, Delos and Hellenistic Commerce” , CAH , Vol. VIII, Rome and the Mediterranean 218-133 BC, Cambridge University Press, 1930, 619-642; Bresson, A., “Les campagnes de l’Ouest de l’Asie Mineure à l’epoque hellénistique”, L’Orient méditerranéen de la mort d’Alexandre aux campagnes de Pompée, Actes du colloque International de la SOPHAU Rennes 4-6 Avril 2003, Rennes 2003, s. 193-217 ; Michaelides, D., “The Economy of Cyprus During the Hellenistic and Roman Periods”, The Development of the Cypriot Economy from the Prehistoric Period to the Present Day, (ed.) V. Karageorghis, D. Michaelides, Nicosia 1996, 139-152; Michaelidou Nicolao, I., “Cyprus in the Hellenistic World”, Akten des XIII. Internationalen Kongresses für Klassische Archaologie Berlin 1988, Mains am Rhein 1990, 439-440; Mlynarrczyk, J., Nea Paphos in the Hellenistic Period, Nea Paphos III, Varsovie 1990.
10The effect of city states to Mediterranean commerce during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Satre, M., L’Asie Mineure et l’Anatolie d’Alexandre a Dioclétien, IVe siécle av.J.C./IIIe siécle ap.J.C., Paris 1995.
11Producers, merchants and tax systems during the Hellenistic Period Reading: Reger, G., Regionalism and Change in the Economy of Independent Delos, 314-167 B.C., Hellenistic Culture and Society, Vol.XIV, 1994
12Agricultural goods in Mediterranean Basin during the Hellenistic Reading: Casson, L., “Maritime Trade in Antiquity”, Archaeology 34.4, 1981, 37-43; Descat, R., “L’approvisionnement en grain dans le monde grec des cités: histoires d’une politique”, Nourrir les cités de Méditerranée Antiquité-Temps modernes, (ed.) B. Marin, C. Virlouvet, Collections l’ateliér méditerranéen, Paris 2003, 589-612; Reger, G., “Regions Revisted. Identifying Regions in a greco-Roman Mediterranean Context”, Facta A Journal of Roman Material Culture Studies, Roma 2007-1, 65-74.
13Important industrial goods in the Mediterranean commerce during the Hellenistic PeriodReading: Burnstein, S.M., “Ivory and Ptolemaic Exploration of the Red Sea The Missing Factor”, Topoi 6 1996, fasc. 2, 799-807; Kögler, P., “Import,Export, Imitation. Trade and the Economic Power of the LAte Hellenistic and Early Imperial Knidos According to the Fine Pottery”, Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence, (ed.) M.B. Briese, L.E. Vaag, Denmark 2005, 50-62.
14The effect of the wars to Mediterranean economy during the third and second c. BCReading: Lund, J., Rhodian Amphorae as Evidence for the Relations between Late Punic Carthage and Rhodes, Aspects of Hellenism in Italy, 5 Acta, Hiperborea 1993, 359-375; Duyrat, F., “La Phénicie hellénistique”, Royaumes et cités hellénistiques de 323 à 55 av. J.-C., O.Picard, et alii, Sedes 2003, 83-107; Astin, A.E., Rome and the Mediterranean to 133 BC, CAH, Vol. VIII, Second Edition 2006, 44-197.
15The characteristics of the economic revolution under the rule of Roman power in Mediterranean Reading: Heichelheim, F.M., An Ancient Economic History, Vol.I, Leiden 1958; Rostovtzeff, M., A Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World, 1941; Greene, K., "Technological innovation and Economic Progress in the ancient world: M.I. Finlay reconsidered, Economic history Review 53 no.1, 29-59, 2000.
16Final Examination
Recommended or Required Reading
Selected Bibliography: Ballet, P., La Vie quotidienne a Alexandrie 331-30 avant J.-C., Hachette Paris 1999. Berthold, R. M., Rhodes in the Hellenistic Age, Ithaca and London, 1984. Casson, L., “Maritime Trade in Antiquity”, Archaeology 34.4, 1981. Ellis, W.M., Ptolemy of Egypt, London 1994. Fraser, P.M., Ptolemaic Alexandria, I.Text, Oxford 1972. Heichelheim, F.M., An Ancient Economic History, Vol.I, Leiden 1958. Heichelheim, F.M., An Ancient Economy, Vol.III, Leiden 1970. Reger, G., Regionalism and Change in the Economy of Independent Delos, 314-167 B.C., Hellenistic Culture and Society, Vol.XIV, 1994. Rostovtzeff, M., Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World, Vol.I-II 1941.
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
SUM0
Language of Instruction
Turkish
Work Placement(s)
None
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Midterm Examination122
Final Examination122
Attending Lectures16232
Discussion10110
Team/Group Work212
Individual Study for Homework Problems5315
Individual Study for Mid term Examination11010
Individual Study for Final Examination11111
Reading12336
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)120
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
PO
1
PO
2
PO
3
PO
4
PO
5
PO
6
PO
7
PO
8
PO
9
PO
10
LO14      5  
LO23      5  
LO35   5  5  
LO45   5  5  
LO5          
* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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