Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
10721402T11413MEDITERRANAEN TRADE IN THE ROMAN PERIODElective474
Level of Course Unit
First Cycle
Objectives of the Course
The modern study of economies requires types of data which simply are not found in the written sources of the Roman Empire. Among the commercial traces of Roman Period, amphora studies have made a striking contribution to our knowledge of ancient trade. The interrelation between the cities, argricultural producion of the rural settlements and the hinterland of the important cities, trade routes, ports and the industrial production of the regions are discussed in this lecture
Name of Lecturer(s)
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmet Kaan ŞENOL
Learning Outcomes
1 To understand the basic lines of the Roman economy
2 Understanding the precautions of Rome on the Mediterranean commerce
3 To see the tax systems during the Roman Imperial Period
4 To have knowledge about the goods in Mediterranean commerce during the Roman Imperial Period
5 Understanding the commercial maritime and land routes during the Roman Imperial Period
6 Comparing the agricultural production and industrial production modes used in Rome and the provinces
Mode of Delivery
Face to Face
Prerequisites and co-requisities
None
Recommended Optional Programme Components
None
Course Contents
The main topics of the course as follows: Approaches to the Roman economy; models of the Roman economy; Roman Agriculture; Roman Industry; sea routes and transport on land Economic movements during the Republican Period; main structure of the Roman Mediterranean Commerce duirng the Imperial Perio; regional commercial relations; long-distance trade during the Roman Period
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
1Examining the concept of the program and presenting the bibliography.Searching the concept of the courses.
2Economic position of Italian Peninsula during the Roman Republican Period Reading: Garnsey, P., Saller, R., An Underdeveloped Economy, The Roman Empire, Economy, Society and Culture, Los Angeles 1987, 43-63; Pleket, H.W., “Economic History of the Ancient World and Epigraphy: Some Introductory Remarks”, Epigraphic und Wirtschaftsgeschichte, Akten des VI. Internationalen Kongress für Griechische und Latenische Epigraphik, München 1973, 243-257
3Economic structure of the Roman Imperal Peirod Reading: Broughton, T.R., "Remarks on the Roman Empire and Mediterranean Trade", Arch. News. VIII, 2/3, 1979, 95-96; Cameron, A., VIII Late Roman Economy and Society, The Later Roman Empire AD 284-430, Cambridge 1993, 1-238; Temin, P., “A Market Economy in the Early Roman Empire”, JRS, Vol. XCI, 2001, s. 169-181; Ligt, L., Fairs and Markets in the Roman Empire, Economic and Social Aspects of Periodic Trade in a pre-Industrial Society, Amsterdam 1993.
4Flactuations of the Mediterranean economy after Pax Romana Reading: Harris, W.V., “Production, Distribution and Instrumentum Domesticum”, Manacorda, D., “Appunti sulla bollatura in eta romana”, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary series No.6, The Inscribed Pottery, Production and Distribution in the Roman Empire in the Light of Instrumentum Domesticum, ed. by W.V.Harris, Ann Arbor 1993, 186-189.
5Commercial rotes during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: Charlesworth, M.P., Trade Routes and Commerce of the Roman Empire, Cambridge 1926, s.16,47, 188-191, 247-249; Chevalier, R., Roman Roads, London 1976, s.144-147, 192-193,200-205; Sidebotham, S.E., “Romans and Arabs in the Red Sea”, Topoi 6, 1996, 785-797; Parker, A.J., "Cargoes, Containers and Stowage: the Ancient Mediterranean", Nautical Archaeology, 21.2, 1992, 89-100.
6Commercial systems during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: Fulford, M., "Economic Independence Among Urban Communities of the Roman Mediterranean", World Archaeology, Vol.19, No.1, June 1987, 58-75; Garnsey, P., Saller, R., An Underdeveloped Economy, The Roman Empire, Economy, Society and Culture, Los Angeles 1987, 43-63; Harris, W.V., “Between Archaic and Modern: Some Current Problems in the History of the Roman Economy”, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary series No.6, The Inscribed Pottery, Production and Distribution in the Roman Empire in the Light of Instrumentum Domesticum, ed. by W.V.Harris, Ann Arbor 1993, 11-29; Meijer, F., van Nijf, O., Transport and Society in the Ancient World, London 1992, XXII, 52-89; Pleket, H.W., “Economic History of the Ancient World and Epigraphy: Some Introductory Remarks”, Epigraphic und Wirtschaftsgeschichte, Akten des VI. Internationalen Kongress für Griechische und Latenische Epigraphik, München 1973, 243-257; Temin, P., “A Market Economy in the Early Roman Empire”, JRS, Vol. XCI, 2001, s. 169-181.
7Taxes during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: Hopkins, K., "Taxes and Trade in the Roman Empire (200 B.C.-A.D.400)", The Journal of Roman Studies, Vol.LXX, 1980, 101-125; Carrié, J.-M., “L’institution annonaire de la premiére à la deuxiéme Roma: continuité et innovation”, Nourrir les cités de Méditerranée Antiquité-Temps modernes, (ed.) B. Marin, C. Virlouvet, Collections l’ateliér méditerranéen, Paris 2003, 153-211.
8Midterm examination
9The commerce of agricultural goods and Roman villae rusticaeReading: Lewit, T., Villas, Farms and the Late Roman Rural Economy (third to fifth centuries AD), BAR Int Ser 568, 2004,. 1-53, 116-157; Duncan-Jones, R., Agriculural Investment and Agricultural Profits, The Economy of the Roman Empire, Cambridge 1982, 33-59, 368-377. Meijer, F., van Nijf, O., Transport and Society in the Ancient World, London 1992, XXII, 93-129
10Oleoculture and viniculture in Mediterranean during the Roman Imperial Age Reading: Parker, A.J., “The Wines of Roman Italy”, JRA, Vol.3, 1990,s.325-331; Purcell, N., “Wine and Wealth in Ancient Italy”, JRS, Vol. LXXV, 1985, 1-19; Amouretti, M.C., Brun, J.P., Oil and Wine Production in the Mediterranean Area BCH Suppl.26, 1993, 1-619; Dayyeh, A.S., “Historical and Archaeological Study on Olive Oil Production in Antiquity in the Eastern Mediterranean in Light of the ‘Abdun Press Installation”, Studies in the History and Archaeology of Jordan VIII, 2004, 29-39; D.J., “Oil for Export ? A Comparison of Libyan, Spanish and Tunisian Olive Oil Production in the Roman Empire”, JRA, Vol. 1, 1988, 33-56.
11Commerce of luxurious goods during the Roman Imperial Age Reading: Gratton, K., “Production et échange de la pourpre au proche Orient aux époques grecques et romaine”, Topoi suppl. 8, 2007, 151-172; Braemer, F., “Le commerce des idees, des hommes et des objects luxueux-lourds, encombrants et fragiles dans la mediterranee romane”, L’Exploitation de la Mer, Viémes Rencontres Internationales d’Archéologique et d’Histoire, Antibes, Octobre 1985, 143-169
12Commerce of industrial goods during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: Cockle, H., “Pottery Manufacture in Roman Egypt, A New Papyrus”, The Journal of Roman Studies LXXI, 1981, 87-97; Peacock, D.P.S., Pottery in the Roman World: an archaeological approach, Newyork, 1982, 142-159; Whittaker, D., "Amphorae and Trade", Amphores Romaines et Histoire Économique: Dix Ans de Recherche, Collection de l'École Française de Rome 114, 1989, 537-539; Tomber, R., “Quantitative Approaches to the Investigation of Long-Distance Exchange”, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Vol. 6, 1993, 142-165
13Eastern and long distance commerce during the Roman Imperial AgeOkuma: Raschke, M., New Studies in Roman Commerce with the East, s.758-759, 858-859, 904-905, 1022-1023; Ray, H.P., “A resurvey of Roman Contacts with the East”, Topoi 3, 1993, fasc.2, 479-491; Tomber, R.., “Polarising and Integrating the Late Roman Economy: The Role of Late Roman Amphorae 1-7”, Ancient West and East, vol. 3, no. 1, Boston 2004, 155-165.
14Commercial relations of Rome with southern provinces during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: Arnaoutoglou, LN., “Collegia in the Province of Egypt in the First Century AD”, Ancient Soicety, 35, 2005, 197-216; Aubert, J.-J., “Workshop Managers”, JRA, Suppl. Ser. 6, The Inscribed Economy, Production and Distribution in the Roman Empire in the Light of instrumenum demesticum, Ann Arbor 1993, 171-181; Bagnall, R.S., “The Beginnings of the Roman Census in Egypt”, Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies, Vol. 32, No.3, 1991, 255-265; Bowman, A.K., Rathbone, D., “Cities and Administration in Roman Egypt”, The Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. LXXXII, 1992, 106-127; Gagos, T., Minen, P., “Documenting the Rural Economy of Byzantine Egypt Three Papyri from Alabastrine”, JRA, vol. 5, 1992, 186-202; Rathbone, D., Economic Rationalism and Rural Society in Third Century A.D. Egypt, The Heronino Archive and the Appianus estate, Cambridge 1991, s.1-5, 188-195, 244-261, 278-307.
15The importance of the commerce of cereals during the Roman Imperial AgeReading: De Romanis, F., “Per una storiadel tributo granario africano all’annona della Roma imperiale”, Nourrir les cités de Méditerranée Antiquité-Temps modernes, (ed.) B. Marin, C. Virlouvet, Collections l’ateliér méditerranéen, Paris 2003, 691-740; Descat, R., “L’approvisionnement en grain dans le monde grec des cités: histoires d’une politique”, Nourrir les cités de Méditerranée Antiquité-Temps modernes, (ed.) B. Marin, C. Virlouvet, Collections l’ateliér méditerranéen, Paris 2003, 589-612.
16Final Examination
Recommended or Required Reading
Selective Bibliography: Frank, T., (ed.) T.R.S.Broughton, An Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, Roman Asia, Vol.IV, Baltimore, 1938 Satre, M., L’Asie Mineure et l’Anatolie d’Alexandre a Dioclétien, IVe siécle av.J.C./IIIe siécle ap.J.C., Paris 1995 Charlesworth, M.P., Trade Routes and Commerce of the Roman Empire, Cambridge 1926 Harris, W.V., “Between Archaic and Modern: Some Current Problems in the History of the Roman Economy”, JRA, Suppl.VI, The Inscribed Economy, 1993 Hopkins, K., "Taxes and Trade in the Roman Empire (200 B.C.-A.D.400)", The Journal of Roman Studies, Vol.LXX, 1980 Garnsey, P., Saller, R., An Underdeveloped Economy, The Roman Empire, Economy, Society and Culture, Los Angeles 1987. Green, K., Archaeology of Roman Economy, 1986. Brown, D. Roman Craftsmen and Their Tehniques, London 1974. -Burford, A., Craftsmen in Greek and Roman Society, Ithaca 1972. -Chilver, G.E.F., Cisalpine Gaul; Social and Economic History from 49 B.C. to the Death of Trajan, Oxford 1941. -Coleman-Norton, R.R., ed. Studies in Roman Economic and Social History in Honor of Allan Chester Johnson. Princeton 1951. -Duncan-Jones, R., The Economy of the Roman Empire, Cambridge 1974. -Heichelheim, F.M., An Economic History of the Ancient World, Leiden 1959. -Harris, W.V., “Between Archaic and Modern: Some Current Problems in the History of the Roman Economy”, JRA, Suppl.VI, The Inscribed Economy, 1993 -Heitland, W.E. Agricola. A study on Agriculture and Rustic Life in the Greco-Roman World, Cambridge 1921. -Jones, A.H.M., Brunt, P.A. The Roman Economy: Studies in the Ancient Economic and Administrative History, Cambridge 1972. -Miller, J.I., The Spice Trade of the Roman Empire 29 B.C.-A.D. 641, Oxford 1969. -Paul-Lois., Ancient Rome at Work; An Economic History of Rome from the Origins to the Empire, London 1927. -Toutain, J., The Economic Life of the Ancient World, ed. M.R.Dobie. New York 1951. -White, K.D., Roman Farming, Ithaca 1970. -Meijer, F., van Nijf, O., Transport and Society in the Ancient World, London 1992, XXII. -Rathbone, D., Economic Rationlism and Rural Society in Third Century A.D. Egypt, The Heronino Archive and the Appianus estate, Cambridge 1991.
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
SUM0
Language of Instruction
Turkish
Work Placement(s)
None
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Midterm Examination122
Final Examination122
Attending Lectures16232
Question-Answer10110
Team/Group Work212
Individual Study for Homework Problems5315
Individual Study for Mid term Examination11010
Individual Study for Final Examination11111
Reading12336
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)120
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
PO
1
PO
2
PO
3
PO
4
PO
5
PO
6
PO
7
PO
8
PO
9
PO
10
LO14   4  4  
LO24   5  4  
LO35   5  5  
LO45   5  5  
LO55   5  5  
LO6          
* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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