Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
9201055852018Art in Egypt in the Ptolemaic PeriodElective116
Level of Course Unit
Second Cycle
Objectives of the Course
Egypt was in cultural, social and commercial contact with all Mediterranean civilizations through the ages. Since the Pharonic Period their developed culture has exempified in varied ways to the western cultures. By the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great, Greeks but mostly Macedonians had relations with Egyptians. The Ptolemees who were the successors of Alexander and assumed to govern Egypt after his death, administrated until the conquest of Egypt by Romans in 30 BC. Macedonian rulers have revealed a style in art which is consideredas a Ptolemaic Art by gathering the dominant Pharonic art which had gone on for a long time with the Greek traditions. This style showed itself in any kind of arts as sculpture, painting, religious and civil architecture, in religious and funerary traditions and in every way of daily life. The aim of this course is to introduce this art, to show the students the characteristics of the combination of Greek and Egyptian style in Ptolemaic Period which corresponds to the Hellenistic Period in Greek world.
Name of Lecturer(s)
Prof. Dr. Gonca Şenol
Learning Outcomes
11. To get information on historical events after the end of the Persian rule in Egypt.
22. To discuss the arrival of Alexander the Great in Egypt, and to asses the foundation of Alexandria in 332 BC and the inportance of the city for the Ptolemaic Kingdom.
33. To obtain knowledge about the Ptolemaic dynasty, the ruling periods of Ptolemaic kings and their activities during their administration.
44. To research the religious and civil architectural monuments in Egypt in the Ptolemaic Period and the comparisions with greek contemporaries.
55. To identify the effects of Ptolemies to the Egytian plastic arts.
66. To recognize the art of painting in Egypt under the rule of Ptolemaic Kings. Funerary traditions and the reflections of old Egyptian religious traditions to Ptolemaic art.
77. To get information about the craftmanship and examples related to this in the Ptolemaic Period (mosaics, glass wares, terracotta figurines, etc..).
88. To quote the importance of Alexandria through the Ptolemaic Period and its economic and commercial contribution to the country.
99. To emphasize the cultural and economic relations of Ptolemaic Egypt with neighbouring centers as Cyprus, Asia Minor, etc.
Mode of Delivery
Face to Face
Prerequisites and co-requisities
Recommended Optional Programme Components
Course Contents
1. The end of Persian rule and political situation of Egypt in this period. 2. Arrival of Alexandre the Great into Egypt, foundation of Alexandria. Architectural plan of the city, advantages of its geographical localisation and important architectural buildings in the city. 3. Macedonian Ptolemaic dynasty which took over the rule after the death of Alexandre. Ptolemaic dynasty, periods of the kings and their activities during their administration. 4. Religious and civil architectural buildings in Alexandria and Egypt under the rule of Ptolemies. 5. Plastic arts in Egypt during the reign of Ptolemies. 6. Art of painting by means of wall paintings seen especially on the funerary tombs, funerary ceremonies and the combination of Greek and Egyptian features. 7. Introduction of handcraftman and their works in the Ptolemaic Period (mosaics, glasswares and terracotta figurines). 8. Importance of Alexandria for the developement of Ptolemaic art in Egypt. 9. Relations of Ptolemies with the other Eastern Mediterranean civilizations.
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
0Introduction of the course: Contents, importance of the subject and presentation of the bibliographyMeeting and searching the contents of the course
1End of Persian rule in EgyptReading (Bunson 2002)
2Military expedition of Alexandre the Great and his arrival to Egypt. The foundation of Alexandria, its location and importance for Egypt. Reading (Bunson 2002)
3Death of Alexandre the Great and the assumption of administration of Egypt by the Ptolemaic dynasty. Policy of the Ptolemaic rulers, and their commercial, artistic, economic, military and cultural activities. Reading (McKenzie 2007)
4Policy of the Ptolemaic rulers, and their commercial, artistic, economic, military and cultural activities. Reading (McKenzie 2007)
5Documentary on the excavations in Alexandria Practice
6Architectural developement in Egypt in the Ptolemaic PeriodReading (McKenzie, p. 37-40, 80-96)
7Midterm exam
8Significant buildings in Alexandria: Library, Museion, Pharos, Heptastadion, Serapeion, palacesReading (McKenzie, p. 40-71)
9Necropolei in and around Alexandria and funerary ceremoniesReading (McKenzie, s. 71-74)
10Religion and traditions in EgyptReading (Empereur 2003)
11Developement of plastic arts under the Ptolemaic rulersReading (Stanwick 2002)
12Handcrafts and in EgyptReading (Kassab-Tezgör 2007; Rodziewicz 2007)
13Presentation of seminar Presentation of seminar
14Presentation of seminar Presentation of seminar
15Final exam
Recommended or Required Reading
J.-Y. Empereur, Alexandrie redécouverte, 1998. J. McKenzie, The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt: 300B.C.-A.D. 700, Yale University Press, 2007. J.-Y. Empereur, Le Phare d'Alexandrie La Merveille retrouvée, Ed.: Gallimard - Collection : Découvertes Gallimard, 2e édition, 2004. J.-Y. Empereur, A Short Guide to the Græco-Roman Museum, Alexandria, Harpocrates, 2000. J.-Y. Empereur, A Short Guide to the Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa, Alexandria, 2nd ed. 2003. P. E. Stanwick, Portraits of the Ptolemies: Greek Kings As Egyptian Pharaohs, 2002. Alexandria, third century BC, The knowledge of the world in a single city, Ed. by Christian Jacob & François de Polignac 2000. Nécropolis 1, éd. par J.-Y. Empereur et M.-D. Nenna, Etudes Alexandrines 5, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Le Caire, 2001. Nécropolis 2, éd. par J.-Y. Empereur et M.-D. Nenna, Etudes Alexandrines 7, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Le Caire, 2003. D. Kassab-Tezgör, Tanagréennes d'Alexandrie, Etudes Alexandrines 13, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Le Caire, 2007. E. Rodziewicz, Bone and Ivory Carvings from Alexandria, French Excavations 1992-2004, Etudes Alexandrines 12, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Le Caire, 2007. M. Sabottka, Das Serapeum in Alexandria, Untersuchungen zur Architektur und Baugeschichte des Heiligtums von der frühen ptolemäischen Zeit bis zur Zerstörung 391 n.Chr., Etudes Alexandrines 15, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Le Caire, 2008. M. R. Bunson, Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, 2002. Web Kaynaklar: http://cealex.org. http://www.1001images.com/bande_annonce/bande_annonce_2013.html
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
SUM0
SUM0
Language of Instruction
Turkish
Work Placement(s)
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Attending Lectures12336
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)36
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
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* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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